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MovieCalendar

  • Mon 21 Sep 11:00 Shirley Read more Order tickets directly
  • Mon 21 Sep 11:15 Eté 85 Read more Order tickets directly
  • Eté 85
    For all screenings:
    Grim-faced 16-year-old Alex Robin (Félix Lefebvre) is being questioned by police about what we are led to believe is the murder of his best friend, 18-year-old David Gorman (Benjamin Voisin). Cue the flashbacks to a heady, beachside summer romance between the two that begins when David rescues Alex from a capsized sailboat and blossoms—for Alex, at least—into an earth-shaking first love… François Ozon’s nostalgic look back to the mid-80s is a romantic, sexy, and ultimately tragic coming-of-age tale that is awash in gorgeous colour and sunny locations, and anchored by two fine performances from Lefebvre and Voisin, two relative unknowns who are destined for great things. A treat!

    ‘In terms of style, Summer of 85 is a lightheaded throwback to the bold, insouciant spirit of the director's earliest works. But here, the story and the characters' supposed naiveté and the almost-too-obvious stylistic flourishes aren't just nods to his younger, less-refined m.o. They are actually part of a master storyteller's tools to seduce a grown-up audience into considering how youngsters not only experience their own lives but also how they process and talk about them… [Pascaline Chavanne’s] costumes grab your attention but only because that's what 1980s clothes do to our 2020 eyes, and more specifically, that's exactly what youngsters who want to express themselves are after. And boy, do the boys of Summer of 85 succeed in grabbing our attention.’—Boyd van Hoeij, Hollywood Reporter
    Zaal 3
  • Mon 21 Sep 11:15 Öndög Read more Order tickets directly
  • Mon 21 Sep 13:45 Barn Read more Order tickets directly
  • Barn
    For all screenings:
    When 12-year-old Lykke (first-time actor Ella Øverbye, a natural) loses her temper with classmate Jamie on the playing field, their altercation—an accident, it seems—leads to his death in hospital. What follows is a deeply intelligent drama that looks at the aftermath of the tragic event as it affects students, parents and teachers. Writer-director Dag Johan Haugerud enlists a large and uniformly excellent ensemble cast to explore issues of guilt, moral ambiguity, and secrets both personal and political. That the English title is Beware of Children gives us a hint of what to expect… The film captured nine Amanda awards (Norway’s equivalent to the Oscar), including Best Director, Best Screenplay, Best Actor, and Best Cinematography.

    ‘Could Dag Johan Haugerud’s second feature be the best 157-minute Norwegian humanist film ever made? … Meticulously unveiling layer after layer of seemingly random and clearly crucial details of the events, Haugerud introduces a group of very human human beings in the process… For most of these utterly well-spent 157 minutes, this work by a significant humanist filmmaker and his thoroughly first-rate cast and crew is a richly rewarding treat to behold.’—Jan Lumholdt, Cineuropa
    Zaal 4
  • Mon 21 Sep 14:00 De beentjes van Sint-Hildegard Read more Order tickets directly
  • Mon 21 Sep 14:15 Misbehaviour Read more Order tickets directly
  • Misbehaviour
    For all screenings:
    Based on actual events that took place at the 1970 Miss World competition in London, Philippa Lowthorpe’s perfectly cast comedic drama recounts how a group of feminists led by Sally Alexander (Keira Knightley) and Jo Robinson (Jessie Buckley) disrupted the live television presentation of the competition by dousing host Bob Hope (Greg Kinnear) in flour and staging a protest against the objectification of women. We get all the delicious backstory here from both the feminists’ and the organisers’ points of view, and the result is both hilarious and mind-bogglingly retrograde—except for the ironic outcome, in which Miss Grenada (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) became the first woman of colour to capture the crown. And that is to say nothing of the equally mind-boggling costumes! Groovy!

    ‘Lovable, funny and smart… It’s sensitive to the intersectional complexities of identity politics and protest, accessibly pragmatic and generally solid… Lowthorpe proves adept here at marshalling the material and drawing empathic performances from the more-than-competent cast. The jocular, amiable tone helps deliver the more serious social history lesson throughout… The film delivers with quips, japes and deliciously ugly vintage prints throughout in the costuming, with lashings of girl-empowerment sisterly bonding to drive it all home.‘—Leslie Felperin, Hollywood Reporter
    Zaal 3
  • Mon 21 Sep 16:15 Gli anni più belli Read more Order tickets directly
  • Gli anni più belli
    For all screenings:
    Collapsing 40 years of Italian and world history into just over two hours of screen time, director and co-writer Gabriele Muccino chronicles the relationships between four friends, and shows how the momentous events of the last four decades—the fall of the Berlin Wall and 9/11 among them—affect both them and Italian society in general. Big themes and big ideas, yes, but Muccino anchors things on a very human level: as Giulio, Paolo and Riccardo (Pierfrancesco Favino, Kim Rossi Stuart and Claudio Santamaria, respectively) and Gemma (Micaela Ramazzotti) come together, drift apart, and re-unite according to the vagaries of their individual lives, we come to know why the film is called (in English) The Best Years…

    ‘A confirmation of Muccino’s filmmaking prowess and his outstanding skill in directing actors, The Best Years won’t disappoint his loyal public, not least for the cast’s excellent performance… The command the director has over the scenic space and the originality of the film’s framing and camera movements ultimately result in some highly affecting sequence shots and several unforgettable scenes…’—Camillo De Marco, Cineuropa
    Zaal 1 (90)
  • Mon 21 Sep 16:30 Babyteeth Read more Order tickets directly
  • Babyteeth
    For all screenings:
    For 16-year-old Milla (Eliza Scanlen, superb), the 23-year-old Moses (Toby Wallace, equally superb) is adventurous and dangerous; for her parents, psychiatrist Henry (Ben Mendelsohn) and former musician Anna (Essie Davis) he’s a self-destructive, homeless junky with a serious attitude problem. Given that Milla has terminal cancer—and that her first love will also probably be her last—how does one proceed? This is the core problem in Shannon Murphy’s original take on adolescent love and all its inherent drama. That her film is brazenly funny and emotionally honest makes it one of the most intelligent and interesting debuts in a long time.

    ‘A wickedly perverse and, in time, intensely moving variation on familiar coming-of-age themes… Babyteeth serves as a fully-fledged coming-out ball for 20-year-old star Eliza Scanlen… She nails a tricky assignment in her big-screen debut, playing both an ethereal otherness and a yearning, immediate, only-too-recognizable adolescent want in the cancer-stricken Milla—as befits a character who has both accepted that she’s not long for this world, and resolved to make herself a little more worldly within it before her time’s up.’—Guy Lodge, Variety
    Zaal 3
  • Mon 21 Sep 16:45 Cunningham Read more Order tickets directly
  • Mon 21 Sep 19:00 Cunningham Read more Order tickets directly
  • Mon 21 Sep 19:00 Eté 85 Read more Order tickets directly
  • Eté 85
    For all screenings:
    Grim-faced 16-year-old Alex Robin (Félix Lefebvre) is being questioned by police about what we are led to believe is the murder of his best friend, 18-year-old David Gorman (Benjamin Voisin). Cue the flashbacks to a heady, beachside summer romance between the two that begins when David rescues Alex from a capsized sailboat and blossoms—for Alex, at least—into an earth-shaking first love… François Ozon’s nostalgic look back to the mid-80s is a romantic, sexy, and ultimately tragic coming-of-age tale that is awash in gorgeous colour and sunny locations, and anchored by two fine performances from Lefebvre and Voisin, two relative unknowns who are destined for great things. A treat!

    ‘In terms of style, Summer of 85 is a lightheaded throwback to the bold, insouciant spirit of the director's earliest works. But here, the story and the characters' supposed naiveté and the almost-too-obvious stylistic flourishes aren't just nods to his younger, less-refined m.o. They are actually part of a master storyteller's tools to seduce a grown-up audience into considering how youngsters not only experience their own lives but also how they process and talk about them… [Pascaline Chavanne’s] costumes grab your attention but only because that's what 1980s clothes do to our 2020 eyes, and more specifically, that's exactly what youngsters who want to express themselves are after. And boy, do the boys of Summer of 85 succeed in grabbing our attention.’—Boyd van Hoeij, Hollywood Reporter
    Zaal 3
  • Mon 21 Sep 19:00 Paradise Drifters Read more Order tickets directly
  • Paradise Drifters
    For all screenings:
    Three homeless youths link up for a character-revealing road trip in Mees Peijnenburg raw and hopeful debut feature. Lorenzo (Jonas Smulders), in thrall to an imprisoned older brother, agrees to deliver “something” to Marseille in order to make some money. Along the way, he comes across the fiery Chloe (Tamar van Waning) and the rather helpless Yousef (Bilal El Mehdi Wahib), and the three of them unexpectedly find confidence and security together during the voyage, something they've been looking for all their lives…

    ‘A soulful debut feature [from writer-director Mees Peijnenburg]… distinguished by the vibrant cinematography of Jasper (Monos) Wolf and expressive performances from a cast led by notable newcomer Tamar van Waning… There is a dynamic energy to Peijnenburg’s storytelling as he occasionally fractures the timeline and lets the story fold back on itself to reveal some hidden truth… The plight of homeless young adults sounds like the stuff of grim social realism but Paradise Drifters is distinguished by its sense of hope… A thoroughly involving story.’—Allan Hunter, Screen
    Zaal 4
  • Mon 21 Sep 19:15 Shirley Read more Order tickets directly
  • Mon 21 Sep 21:00 Babyteeth Read more Order tickets directly
  • Babyteeth
    For all screenings:
    For 16-year-old Milla (Eliza Scanlen, superb), the 23-year-old Moses (Toby Wallace, equally superb) is adventurous and dangerous; for her parents, psychiatrist Henry (Ben Mendelsohn) and former musician Anna (Essie Davis) he’s a self-destructive, homeless junky with a serious attitude problem. Given that Milla has terminal cancer—and that her first love will also probably be her last—how does one proceed? This is the core problem in Shannon Murphy’s original take on adolescent love and all its inherent drama. That her film is brazenly funny and emotionally honest makes it one of the most intelligent and interesting debuts in a long time.

    ‘A wickedly perverse and, in time, intensely moving variation on familiar coming-of-age themes… Babyteeth serves as a fully-fledged coming-out ball for 20-year-old star Eliza Scanlen… She nails a tricky assignment in her big-screen debut, playing both an ethereal otherness and a yearning, immediate, only-too-recognizable adolescent want in the cancer-stricken Milla—as befits a character who has both accepted that she’s not long for this world, and resolved to make herself a little more worldly within it before her time’s up.’—Guy Lodge, Variety
    Zaal 3
  • Mon 21 Sep 21:00 Barn Read more Order tickets directly
  • Barn
    For all screenings:
    When 12-year-old Lykke (first-time actor Ella Øverbye, a natural) loses her temper with classmate Jamie on the playing field, their altercation—an accident, it seems—leads to his death in hospital. What follows is a deeply intelligent drama that looks at the aftermath of the tragic event as it affects students, parents and teachers. Writer-director Dag Johan Haugerud enlists a large and uniformly excellent ensemble cast to explore issues of guilt, moral ambiguity, and secrets both personal and political. That the English title is Beware of Children gives us a hint of what to expect… The film captured nine Amanda awards (Norway’s equivalent to the Oscar), including Best Director, Best Screenplay, Best Actor, and Best Cinematography.

    ‘Could Dag Johan Haugerud’s second feature be the best 157-minute Norwegian humanist film ever made? … Meticulously unveiling layer after layer of seemingly random and clearly crucial details of the events, Haugerud introduces a group of very human human beings in the process… For most of these utterly well-spent 157 minutes, this work by a significant humanist filmmaker and his thoroughly first-rate cast and crew is a richly rewarding treat to behold.’—Jan Lumholdt, Cineuropa
    Zaal 4
  • Mon 21 Sep 21:15 Öndög Read more Order tickets directly
  • Mon 21 Sep 21:30 Sneak Preview Read more Order tickets directly
  • Events

    October 9th, 8.30 pm | International Comedy


    October 22nd – 25th | 013 CIFF (Cinecitta International Film Festival)


     

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