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MovieCalendar

  • Sun 05 Jul 11:00 Les plus belles années d'une vie Read more Order tickets directly
  • Les plus belles années d'une vie
    For all screenings:
    Fifty-three years after the phenomenon that was his international blockbuster A Man and a Woman, director Claude Lelouch lured French acting legends Jean-Louis Trintignant and Anouk Aimée out of retirement (he’s now 89 and she’s 88) for a sequel, reuniting 1966’s race-car driver Jean-Louis Duroc and the love of his life, Anne Gauthier, in this moving chronicle of their waning years. The formerly debonair Jean-Louis, confined to an assisted-care home, is growing more and more befuddled by old age, so his son (Antoine Sire) hatches a plan to bring the still spry Anne back into his father’s life. Lelouch makes delicious use of flashbacks to the first movie—and that great theme song—making this a time-travelling delight.

    ‘There is bittersweet humour and poignant insight here… Seeing these two French screen legends together again, probably for the last time, still creates an almost-tangible chemical fizz. Even at 87, Aimee remains a magnificent human sculpture, while Trintignant tugs the heartstrings as a once-beautiful man sunk into soulful ruin…The Best Years of a Life [the English title] strikes a deeper emotional chord because it is really more concerned with the looming mortality of its stars, its director and even its audience than with the fate of its fictional characters…’—Stephen Dalton, Hollywood Reporter
    Zaal 3
  • Sun 05 Jul 11:00 Honey Boy Read more Order tickets directly
  • Honey Boy
    For all screenings:
    Actor Shia LaBeouf’s personal problems and high-profile ‘performance art’ shenanigans have tended to obscure the fact that he is a very talented actor. Based on the script he wrote—while in rehab—for this autobiographical look at his relationship with his Vietnam-vet father, he is also a gifted writer. He takes the role of his addicted father while Noah Jupe and Lucas Hedges share duties as LaBeouf the younger, a child star whose father is reduced to being the kid’s paid chaperone. As a classically Oedipal—and very toxic—relationship drama plays out, first-time feature director Alma Har’el adds a layer of universality to the mix, making for a powerful and honest look at childhood trauma.

    ‘The script has a searing honesty, but fractured time frames, as the older, tormented Otis recalls his life. Har'el imposes her own dream-like poetic style, but it's rigorously controlled, so that these disparate scenes come together in a disjointed unity. The dream-state suits the material, which is confessional and reflective, a journey into memory through which Otis tries to understand and forgive his father… It's a high-wire act, a movie that could easily have crashed and burned. That it does not has something to do with the shared intensity of character and performance. All three main actors share the stage as equals and the level of commitment is remarkable.’—Paul Byrnes, Sydney Morning Herald
  • Sun 05 Jul 11:15 La Vérité Read more Order tickets directly
  • La Vérité
    For all screenings:
    It seems amazing that no one had thought to pair up two of France’s greatest actors—Catherine Deneuve and Juliette Binoche—as a mother-daughter combo in a film before now, but this writer could find no evidence that they had even been in a movie together, let alone playing mother and daughter. Credit brilliant Japanese director Kore-eda Hirokazu (Cannes Palme d’Or winner Shoplifters) with this masterstroke, then. Deneuve plays Fabienne, the imperious and demanding grande dame of French cinema actresses, and Binoche is her screenwriter-daughter Lumir. Happily living in America, Lumir arrives at Fabienne’s lovely home with American husband (Ethan Hawke) and daughter in tow to celebrate Mommy’s publication of her ‘memoirs’—a book that contains more fiction than fact. From this premise, Kore-eda fashions a lovely, light, yet surprisingly wise look at one family’s faults and foibles. And the acting is nothing short of delicious!

    ‘One of Deneuve's greatest performances, with Kore-eda transforming the magisterial persona she frequently supplies to other directors into something more complex, tragic and yet defiant. She deserves awards for it. And so does the film.’—Kevin Maher, Sunday Times
    Zaal 1 (75)
  • Sun 05 Jul 11:30 Ghost Tropic Read more Order tickets directly
  • Ghost Tropic
    For all screenings:
    When Khadija (the marvellous Saadia Bentaieb), a 58-year-old cleaning lady of Maghrebi origins living and working in Brussels, falls asleep on the last metro one night, she ends up at the opposite end of town from where she wants to be. Beginning with a simple premise—how will a penniless Khadija get home?—director Bas Devos (Berlin festival prize-winner Violet) has fashioned a modest, perfectly crafted gem that speaks volumes about the underclass and race relations in Europe today. Special mention must be made of Grimm Vandekerckhove’s great cinematography, which captures Brussels at night in all its alternate glory and sordidness.

    ‘A beautifully observed, hushed nocturnal odyssey… A delicate miniature that’s magnificently humanist, occasionally amusing and shot in a palette of rich, saturated nighttime hues, this is the kind of really small movie that is actually really great… Devos… manages to paint a quite detailed picture of the complex multicultural melting pot that Brussels has become today and where issues of race, religion, class and social mobility all play a role… Bentaieb delivers a beautifully restrained performance that suggests an innate kindness underneath her weary visage.’—Boyd van Hoeij, Hollywood Reporter
    Ruimte X
  • Sun 05 Jul 13:45 Scandalous Read more Order tickets directly
  • Scandalous
    For all screenings:
    The original purveyor of scandalous facts and fake news, the National Enquirer and its then CEO David Pecker admitted in 2018 to working with Donald Trump’s presidential campaign in what has become known as a ‘catch and kill’ operation: Pecker paid Playboy model Karen McDougal $150,000 in hush money for her story of a sexual affair with Trump, which the paper then suppressed ‘to prevent it from influencing the election’. There’s a squalid irony in that fact, as the tabloid—established in 1926—has thrived by revealing just this kind of information about celebrities past and present. Director Mark Landsman turns the camera around and exposes the corruption and dodgy ‘journalistic’ practices at this baleful institution.

    ‘A hard-hitting—and at times hard-to-stomach—documentary… Scandalous: The Untold Story of the National Enquirer subjects the tabloid to the same treatment it showed so many of its targets, leaning on inside sources to spill the tea on their former employer. Here, in the words of those who worked for the iconic dirt-digging organization, are the secrets of how the Enquirer changed the face of American journalism for the worse, using tactics that defy journalistic ethics—and sometimes also the law.’—Peter Debruge, Variety
    Ruimte X
  • Sun 05 Jul 14:00 De beentjes van Sint-Hildegard Read more Order tickets directly
  • Sun 05 Jul 14:00 Ema Read more Order tickets directly
  • Sun 05 Jul 14:15 Never Rarely Sometimes Always Read more Order tickets directly
  • Never Rarely Sometimes Always
    For all screenings:
    A front-runner for best American film of the year since the moment it debuted at the Sundance Film Festival in January, Eliza Hittman’s (Beach Rats) third feature catapults her to the top rank of indie film directors. Autumn (superb newcomer Sidney Flanigan), 17 and pregnant, lives in a Pennsylvania town where access to an abortion is problematic (to say the least). Accompanied by her cousin Skylar (Talia Ryder, equally impressive), she embarks on both a physical and psychological odyssey that takes her to New York in search of what should be a given in this day and age—the right to determine what happens to her own body… Never strident and grounded in a refreshing naturalism, Hittman’s brilliantly told tale is a poignant take on a situation far too common in the floundering US of A.

    ‘Profundly moving… [The film] manages to blend the gritty authenticity of a documentary with the poetic sensibility of pure cinema. In her impressively measured and beautifully understated third feature, Hittman tells an oft-hidden story of reproductive rights… Yet Never Rarely Sometimes Always never feels polemical. On the contrary, it is perhaps best described as a perfectly observed portrait of female friendship; a coming-of-age story with road-movie inflections, piercingly honest and deeply affecting.’—Mark Kermode, Guardian
    Zaal 1 (75)
  • Sun 05 Jul 16:00 Ghost Tropic Read more Order tickets directly
  • Ghost Tropic
    For all screenings:
    When Khadija (the marvellous Saadia Bentaieb), a 58-year-old cleaning lady of Maghrebi origins living and working in Brussels, falls asleep on the last metro one night, she ends up at the opposite end of town from where she wants to be. Beginning with a simple premise—how will a penniless Khadija get home?—director Bas Devos (Berlin festival prize-winner Violet) has fashioned a modest, perfectly crafted gem that speaks volumes about the underclass and race relations in Europe today. Special mention must be made of Grimm Vandekerckhove’s great cinematography, which captures Brussels at night in all its alternate glory and sordidness.

    ‘A beautifully observed, hushed nocturnal odyssey… A delicate miniature that’s magnificently humanist, occasionally amusing and shot in a palette of rich, saturated nighttime hues, this is the kind of really small movie that is actually really great… Devos… manages to paint a quite detailed picture of the complex multicultural melting pot that Brussels has become today and where issues of race, religion, class and social mobility all play a role… Bentaieb delivers a beautifully restrained performance that suggests an innate kindness underneath her weary visage.’—Boyd van Hoeij, Hollywood Reporter
    Ruimte X
  • Sun 05 Jul 16:30 La bonne épouse Read more Order tickets directly
  • La bonne épouse
    For all screenings:
    It’s 1967 and the sexual revolution is little more than a rumour at the starchy, fading-at-the-edges finishing school headed by the very proper Paulette van der Beck (Juliette Binoche) in the conservative Alsace region of France. The school prepares its young female charges to do what young women in France have always done: serve their future husbands by learning how to cook, sew, clean, and keep up appearances. To this end, Madame van der Beck is aided by her husband Robert (François Berléand), a rather lecherous drunk, Robert’s demented sister Gilberte (Yolande Moreau) and draconian nun Sister Marie-Thérèse (Noémie Lvovsky). But the times, they are a changin’, the school is down to a handful of students, and something’s gotta give… Sunny satire is the order of the day here, as director Martin Provost and star Binoche poke fun at old world attitudes, aided by fine support from some of France’s greatest supporting actors—including the raffish Edouard Baer as the banker who shakes up Binoche’s schoolmarm’s increasingly shaky worldview…
    Zaal 3
  • Sun 05 Jul 16:30 Bacurau Read more Order tickets directly
  • Bacurau
    For all screenings:
    Country; Brazil, France
    Length: 130 min.
    Director: Kleber Mendonça Filho, Juliano Dornelles
    Cast: Sonia Braga, Udo Kier, Bárbara Colen
    Language: Portuguese, English, Dutch subtitles
    Genre: Action, Adventure, Mystery, Sci-Fi, Thriller, Western
    Premiere: 2 July 2020


    Wow! Kleber Mendonça Filho (with co-director Juliano Dornelles) continues the critique of contemporary Brazil displayed in Neighbouring Sounds and Aquarius, but here the art-house gloves are off in favour of a mad—and thoroughly entertaining—concatenation of tropes taken from a half-dozen genres, including the Western, the thriller, action films, mysteries, and even sci-fi… When the defiant town of Bacurau finds itself literally wiped from online maps, a rag-tag group of locals led by Sonia Braga’s booze-swilling doctor and new-in-town beauty Bárbara Colen prepare for a violent confrontation with Udo Kier and his band of mercenaries. To say that all hell breaks loose about sums it up…

    ‘In the wild world of Bacurau, queasy humour meets razor-sharp politics and rivers of blood. An exhilarating fusion of high and low, the movie takes a shopworn premise—townsfolk facing a violent threat—and bats it around until it all goes ka-boom. Part of what’s exciting is how the filmmakers marshal genre in the service of their ideas, using film form to deflect, tease and surprise. The movie looks and plays like a Western but also flirts with dystopian science fiction and pure pulp: bang, bang, splat. By the time the cult actor Udo Kier rolls up it’s clear that anything gleefully goes…’—Manohla Dargis, The New York Times
    Zaal 4
  • Sun 05 Jul 16:45 Les plus belles années d'une vie Read more Order tickets directly
  • Les plus belles années d'une vie
    For all screenings:
    Fifty-three years after the phenomenon that was his international blockbuster A Man and a Woman, director Claude Lelouch lured French acting legends Jean-Louis Trintignant and Anouk Aimée out of retirement (he’s now 89 and she’s 88) for a sequel, reuniting 1966’s race-car driver Jean-Louis Duroc and the love of his life, Anne Gauthier, in this moving chronicle of their waning years. The formerly debonair Jean-Louis, confined to an assisted-care home, is growing more and more befuddled by old age, so his son (Antoine Sire) hatches a plan to bring the still spry Anne back into his father’s life. Lelouch makes delicious use of flashbacks to the first movie—and that great theme song—making this a time-travelling delight.

    ‘There is bittersweet humour and poignant insight here… Seeing these two French screen legends together again, probably for the last time, still creates an almost-tangible chemical fizz. Even at 87, Aimee remains a magnificent human sculpture, while Trintignant tugs the heartstrings as a once-beautiful man sunk into soulful ruin…The Best Years of a Life [the English title] strikes a deeper emotional chord because it is really more concerned with the looming mortality of its stars, its director and even its audience than with the fate of its fictional characters…’—Stephen Dalton, Hollywood Reporter
    Zaal 1 (75)
  • Sun 05 Jul 19:00 Scandalous Read more Order tickets directly
  • Scandalous
    For all screenings:
    The original purveyor of scandalous facts and fake news, the National Enquirer and its then CEO David Pecker admitted in 2018 to working with Donald Trump’s presidential campaign in what has become known as a ‘catch and kill’ operation: Pecker paid Playboy model Karen McDougal $150,000 in hush money for her story of a sexual affair with Trump, which the paper then suppressed ‘to prevent it from influencing the election’. There’s a squalid irony in that fact, as the tabloid—established in 1926—has thrived by revealing just this kind of information about celebrities past and present. Director Mark Landsman turns the camera around and exposes the corruption and dodgy ‘journalistic’ practices at this baleful institution.

    ‘A hard-hitting—and at times hard-to-stomach—documentary… Scandalous: The Untold Story of the National Enquirer subjects the tabloid to the same treatment it showed so many of its targets, leaning on inside sources to spill the tea on their former employer. Here, in the words of those who worked for the iconic dirt-digging organization, are the secrets of how the Enquirer changed the face of American journalism for the worse, using tactics that defy journalistic ethics—and sometimes also the law.’—Peter Debruge, Variety
    Ruimte X
  • Sun 05 Jul 19:15 La Vérité Read more Order tickets directly
  • La Vérité
    For all screenings:
    It seems amazing that no one had thought to pair up two of France’s greatest actors—Catherine Deneuve and Juliette Binoche—as a mother-daughter combo in a film before now, but this writer could find no evidence that they had even been in a movie together, let alone playing mother and daughter. Credit brilliant Japanese director Kore-eda Hirokazu (Cannes Palme d’Or winner Shoplifters) with this masterstroke, then. Deneuve plays Fabienne, the imperious and demanding grande dame of French cinema actresses, and Binoche is her screenwriter-daughter Lumir. Happily living in America, Lumir arrives at Fabienne’s lovely home with American husband (Ethan Hawke) and daughter in tow to celebrate Mommy’s publication of her ‘memoirs’—a book that contains more fiction than fact. From this premise, Kore-eda fashions a lovely, light, yet surprisingly wise look at one family’s faults and foibles. And the acting is nothing short of delicious!

    ‘One of Deneuve's greatest performances, with Kore-eda transforming the magisterial persona she frequently supplies to other directors into something more complex, tragic and yet defiant. She deserves awards for it. And so does the film.’—Kevin Maher, Sunday Times
    Zaal 3
  • Sun 05 Jul 19:15 De beentjes van Sint-Hildegard Read more Order tickets directly
  • Sun 05 Jul 19:30 Never Rarely Sometimes Always Read more Order tickets directly
  • Never Rarely Sometimes Always
    For all screenings:
    A front-runner for best American film of the year since the moment it debuted at the Sundance Film Festival in January, Eliza Hittman’s (Beach Rats) third feature catapults her to the top rank of indie film directors. Autumn (superb newcomer Sidney Flanigan), 17 and pregnant, lives in a Pennsylvania town where access to an abortion is problematic (to say the least). Accompanied by her cousin Skylar (Talia Ryder, equally impressive), she embarks on both a physical and psychological odyssey that takes her to New York in search of what should be a given in this day and age—the right to determine what happens to her own body… Never strident and grounded in a refreshing naturalism, Hittman’s brilliantly told tale is a poignant take on a situation far too common in the floundering US of A.

    ‘Profundly moving… [The film] manages to blend the gritty authenticity of a documentary with the poetic sensibility of pure cinema. In her impressively measured and beautifully understated third feature, Hittman tells an oft-hidden story of reproductive rights… Yet Never Rarely Sometimes Always never feels polemical. On the contrary, it is perhaps best described as a perfectly observed portrait of female friendship; a coming-of-age story with road-movie inflections, piercingly honest and deeply affecting.’—Mark Kermode, Guardian
    Zaal 1 (75)
  • Events

    Monday July 6th, 9:30 pm | Special Sneak Preview 300th anniversary




    October 22nd – 25th | 013 CIFF (Cinecitta International Film Festival)


     

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